How to Watch the 2018 White House Correspondents Dinner Online – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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The White House Correspondents Dinner is here, but once again President Donald Trump will not be in attendance. Insetad, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will sit at the head table. “Daily Show” contributor Michelle Wolf will deliver the roast.

Beginning at 9:30 p.m. ET, C-SPAN will air the awards presentation on TV, on its website, and on its app.

CNN and MSNBC will start televised coverage at 7 p.m. ET, live from the red carpet; Fox News will also show portions of the event. All of the channels will also be covering Trump’s rally in Macomb County, Mich., scheduled to start at 7 p.m.

With the absence of the president and most of Hollywood’s stars, who used to attend, the focus has returned to the actual purpose of the event, said WHCA president Margaret Talev.

“This kind of forced reset has helped us return to what our mission always has been and really should be, which is a moment to raise awareness about the work that we are doing and to remind people of why the news matters and why all Americans benefit from the First Amendment,” she said.

The weekend also sees a host of parties and gatherings within news organizations. Comcast and NBCUniversal will host a post-dinner bash for NBC and MSNBC at the Art Museum of the Americas, and CNN hosts a Hangover Brunch on Sunday.

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HBO’s ‘Succession’ Opens 9th Series Mania to Applause – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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LILLE, France — The world premiere of HBO’s “Succession” proved a fitting opening night series on Friday for a new-look Series Mania, the premier French drama series festival now backed forcefully by the French government and unspooling for the first time in the North-East French city of Lille.

Written by Oscar and WGA nominee Jesse Armstrong (“In the Loop”), whose “Ep. 1” premiered at Lille, kicks off in a pitch black as a man gets out of bed, stumbles through the dark and then urinates onto his lounge carpet. This is Logan Roy (Brian Cox) a self-made billionaire who has built up Waystar Royco into the fifth-biggest media and conglomerate in the world.

But now 80 – the first episode turns loosely on the “surprise” 80th birthday party organized by his wife (Hiam Abbass) – clearly infirm (Cox plays him with a haggard, haunted look suggesting he is as much concerned about intimations of mortality as the next deal on the table),  he is now preparing his succession.

The most likely successor, heralded as an “Heir with Flair” on a “Time”-style magazine cover, is his eldest son by his second marriage, Kendell Roy (Jeremy Strong), who is ambitious but hugely insecure.

“Succession” is about a media family,  creator Jesse Armstrong said onstage at Lyon. But it paints a larger picture, he added: “It’s a little bit about a dysfunctional family, and that happens; and it’s a little bit about dysfunctional politics, and how that happens.”

“It’s a real modern story. It’s about how wealth distances you from life,” added Cox.

That theme plays out across the whole of the first episode. Of Roy’s four children, three have run away from him: his eldest son Connor (Alan Ruck) to a farm in Mexico: daughter Shiv (Sarah Snook), into politics; another, Roman (Kieran Culkin) – who once worked at Waystar Royco, thinking up gee-whizz ideas for films such as one about a robots’ olympics – into drugs and dissolution.

“My man is a self-made man and he has children who are not self-made and have a sense of entitlement, which they don’t necessarily deserve,” Cox went on.

“Succession’s” first episode frames many ideas, such as the inhuman chasm between the filthy rich and normal folk. This is brought out in one memorable scene where the family ‘copters off to the countryside to play a game of baseball and Roman bets the 11-year-old son of the gardener at the field one million dollars that he can’t hit a home run.

Business sometimes comes down to who’s got the biggest dick, Logan tells Kendall as the latter tries to put through the key deal of Ep. 1, buying up a digital media company. The tragedy welling from Ep. 1 looks like that of a man who has spent his whole life trying to prove just that to the whole world, even his own children. He has lost them in the process.

“Succession” played to admiring applause at Lille. If in general new series dramas have proved anything, it is that audiences can react in a sophisticated fashion in their millions to sophisticated drama. “Succession” bore that out at Lille.

“What I liked about ‘Succession’ was the characters. They are nuanced. For example, the biggest ass-hole is meant to be Kendell but in the end he’s semi-sensitive,” said Oriane Wawrzyniak, from Lille, calling herself just a spectator.

Unspooling just two weeks after Canneseries, its rival on the Riviera, Series Mania set out at the opening ceremony the suggest the power of its own endowment at its opening ceremony.

Agilely m.c.ed by France’s Series Mania’s Alessandra Sublet and founder Laurence Herszberg, the gala’s stars cut symptomatically three ways. A long red carpet catwalk of French luminaries climaxed with the surprise appearance of Isabelle Adjani, hidden behind large dark glasses but still looking extraordinary after all these years as she posed for photographers with an air of punk chic.

Other stars, thanked by Herszberg in her opening speech, were French culture minister Françoise Nyssen and, sitting nearby in the audience, Martine Aubry, mayor of Lille, and Xavier Bertrand, president of the Hauts-de-France region in France. Lille bid and won a government tender for support for a TV festival, aimed at turning it into one of the foremost in the world, and then wisely allied with to-date Paris-based Series Mania to launch this year’s first Lille-located event.

This forms part of a high-profile industrial reconversion from Bertrand and Aubry, aimed at turning Lille and France’s North-East, on the mining heart of France, into an advanced audiovisual service sector. It is typical of Series Mania that the biggest cheer of the night went not to stars but two show runners: “False Flag’s” co-creator Maria Feldman and Netflix’s “Narcos” co-creator Chris Brancato, president of Series Mania’s Official Competition jury.

“It’s said in America that we’re living in the age of peak TV. I think they leave one thing out in that we are living in an age of peak international TV,” Brancato told the Lille audience of some 2,000 spectators at its Nouveau Siecle theater..

Reviewing the last decade of trade flow in high-end series, he added: “America’s creative content came internationally and affected international culture. It stands to reason that international shows will come to America and now affect American culture.”

Just how many shows will really do that in any profound way remains to be seen. One recent candidate, Spain’s “La Casa de Papel,” announced last week by Netflix as its most-watched foreign series ever, will see creator Alex Pina talking at Lille next week. It may be series like these which provide the real series star impact which some local Lille press says Series Mania is still lacking.

Series Mania runs April 27 to May 5.

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Bill Bell Lists Iconic Bel Air Estate – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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A renowned estate with an illustrious pedigree in what is arguably the plummiest pocket of Los Angeles’s tony Bel Air community, owned for the last 25-plus years by Bill Bell, scion of the Bell family soap opera dynasty, and his former soap opera writer/producer wife Maria Arena Bell, has come up for sale with an asking price of $37.5 million. Designed in the early 1930s by esteemed high-society architect Wallace Neff for film producer and studio mogul Sol Wurtzel, the elegant Spanish Colonial mansion, represented by Kurt Rappaport at Westside Estate Agency, measures in at 13,361-square feet with five bedrooms and 7.5 bathrooms.

According to Michael Gross’s 2011 real estate page-turner Unreal Estate, the property was purchased in 1953 for a reported $125,000 by celebrity psychic and astrologer-to-the-stars Anthony Norvell, who claimed to have sublet it at various times to Howard Hughes, Prince Ranier of Monaco and, “The King” himself, Elvis Presley. At some point the house came to be owned by British character actor Reginald Owen who, according to Gross, sold it 1962 to heiress, philanthropist and thoroughbred horse owner Dolly Green, daughter of oilman Burton Green, a co-founder of the city of Beverly Hills. Green lived in the house until her death in the fall of 1990 and it was from her heirs and estate the Bells purchased the property in 1991 for $4.775 million.

Positioned high on 1.35 up-sloped acres with a view of the ocean over the Bel-Air Country Club, the elegant home stands the end of a long, gated driveway that swoops up from the street and around the eastern end of the mansion to a discreet motor court at the front of the house where a flamboyant pair of Corinthian columns frame the front door. According to the exhaustively researched, 428-page coffee table book The Legendary Estates of Beverly Hills, written by powerhouse real estate broker Jeff Hyland, co-founder of the Hilton & Hyland brokerage firm, the 180-foot long house was designed with a curved shape that followed the contour of the land with each of the main floor rooms having at least two exposures that opened to deep loggias and/or broad terraces that overlook terraced gardens. According to Shapiro’s tome, “The front door opened into an intimate, circular foyer, which led into a very large—and very grand—oval reception room, with the curving grand staircase on one side. To the right was the huge living room with French doors leading to the arched loggia. To the left was the dining room and breakfast room, both opening onto their loggia, and the kitchen and service wing. The second floor contained the library and four master bedrooms.”

Current marketing materials show the estate additionally offers a gym, spa and screening room and there is additional unspecified living space tucked up under the terrace that surrounds the swimming pool at the western end of the house. Curved staircases cascade down from the terrace that runs along the curved rear façade to a tennis court and vast sweep of lawn surrounded by manicured gardens.

The property is surrounded by other equally plush estates and even larger mansions unsurprisingly owned by financial heavy hitters like Packard Bell founder Beny Alagem, mobile home tycoon Jeffrey Kaplan, A&M Records co-founder Jerry Ross, billionaire financier Gary Winnick, nightclub mogul and hotelier Sam Nazarian and luxury property developer Jason Grosfeld who owns a mansion previously owned by English crooner Dean Martin, Tom Jones and Nicholas Cage.

Property records suggest the Bells additionally maintain a partial interest in a shingled cottage on a rare, double-lot ocean-front property with a beachside swimming pool and spa inside the guarded gates of Malibu’s Colony enclave with the other half being owned by his mother Lee Bell, creator with her late husband William Bell of “The Young and The Restless” and “The Bold and The Beautiful,” and the architectures savvy couple recently completed construction of an über-modern mansion on almost six bluff-top acres above Malibu’s Paradise Cove.

photo: Google

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Thursday Night Previews – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Disney-Marvel’s “Avengers: Infinity War” has launched with a massive $39 million in Thursday night preview showings.

It’s the fourth-highest preview total in history, trailing only “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2.”

Avengers: Infinity War” opens Friday  in 4,474 theaters — the widest release for a Disney title ever and second only to “Despicable Me 3” at 4,529. It’s forecast to open between $225 million and $245 million, with a possibility of crossing the $250 million mark. The hefty launch should go a long way to justify its reported $300 million-plus price tag.

As of now, the biggest opening weekend of all time belongs to “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” which bowed with $248 million in 2015 and went on to make over $936.6 million domestically. Only five films in history have hit the $200 million mark in their debuts.

“Infinity War” picks up two years after the events of “Captain America: Civil War” with the Avengers teaming up with the Guardians of the Galaxy to stop the evil Thanos from inter-galactic dominance. The star-studded cast includes Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man, Chris Hemsworth’s Thor, Chris Evans’ Captain America, Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, Chadwick Boseman’s Black Panther, Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord, Benedict Cumberbatch’s Doctor Strange, and Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk.

Joe and Anthony Russo directed from a script by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely. “Infinity War” is the 19th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

The original “Avengers” had the highest opening to date for a Marvel film, debuting with $207.4 million in 2012. Its sequel, “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” launched with $191 million. The first movie earned $623 million in North America, while the second made $459 million.

“Infinity War” arrives two months and two weeks after Disney-Marvel’s “Black Panther” opened to a sensational $202 million domestically. “Black Panther” has topped $683 million in North America to become the third-highest domestic grosser of all time, behind only “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Avatar.”

Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst with comScore, said it’s not surprising that “Infinity War” should dominate.

“‘Infinity War’ is an irreirresistible confection, a pure popcorn movie that boasts an unprecedented level of concentrated superhero star power that will deliver massive and enthusiastic crowds to multiplexes around the world and prove once again that the power and allure of the communal and immersive movie theater experience for which a film like this is tailor made, remains undeniable,” he added.

A trio of holdovers will be in a battle for second place at about $10 million each — the fourth weekend of John Krasinski’s “A Quiet Place,” the second weekend of Amy Schumer’s “I Feel Pretty,” and the third weekend of Dwayne Johnson’s “Rampage.”

“Black Panther” has generated nearly 20% of 2018’s overall domestic business of $3.52 billion, as of April 25. That figure is down 2.8% over the same period in 2017, according to comScore.

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Kwese Exec to Be Named CEO of Joint Venture With Iflix Africa – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Mayur Patel, currently senior vice president of Africa’s Kwese Mobile Experience, will be named CEO of a joint venture between Kwese and iflix Africa, the regional offshoot of Asia-based streaming service iflix, Variety has learned. The announcement will be made next week.

Patel’s appointment comes at a time of widespread turnover at iflix Africa, a turnover that began in late 2017 as fast-growing iflix continued its aggressive expansion into developing markets to get a jump on players such as Netflix and Amazon. “Most of the management team was dissolved” at one office, one former iflix Africa exec said. “Things weren’t defined. They didn’t know exactly what they wanted. There was a lot of inconsistencies about what we hoped to achieve.”

Kwese, a subsidiary of Econet Media, has emerged as one of Africa’s biggest players since its launch last year, pairing its pay-TV operations with an aggressive mobile strategy while inking deals with the likes of ESPN and Vice.

It also has a partnership with iflix, and announced Wednesday that it had upped its stakes in iflix Africa, with Econet Media CEO Joe Hundah telling Variety the companies would “combine our operations and ultimately offer one app containing both iflix [and Kwese] content.”

“This creates a much stronger proposition and makes sense,” said Hundah (pictured).

Since launching in Malaysia in 2015, iflix has rolled out services in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Africa, positioning itself as an alternative to Netflix in emerging markets. With its launch in sub-Saharan Africa last June, iflix signaled its intent to capitalize on the continent’s youth population and fast-growing Internet and smartphone penetration.

Andre de Wit, then-iflix’s Africa chief, said of the launch: “We are passionately focused on providing the broadest selection of premium content at a price everyone can afford. We can’t wait to tackle both the enormous opportunities and challenges ahead in serving this incredibly diverse and exciting region.”

De Wit left the company in November.

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‘From Afar’s’ Lorenzo Vigas Discusses Documenting His Family in ‘The Orchid Seller’ – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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MORELIA, Mexico — Oswaldo Vigas, one of Venezuela’s most prolific and influential painters of the twentieth century, is the subject of “The Orchid Seller,” a documentary screening at this year’s Morelia Film Festival, which world premiered last year at Venice.

The film was directed by the painter’s son Lorenzo Vigas, an established artist in his own right having been nominated for awards at the Goyas, Mar del Plata and San Sebastian, and winning the Golden Lion at Venice in 2015 for his feature debut “From Afar.”

Mexico’s Lucia Films and Malandro Films co-produced the film which was co-financed by the Venezuelan Film Center (CNAC) and the Mexican Cinematography Institute (IMCINE), in addition to private funds.

“The Orchid Seller,” is a film with two stories. The first is the story of a cross-country quest, embarked upon by a famous painter and his dearly beloved wife, to find a painting that was lost nearly 60 years prior.

The second, and the real heart of the film, is an examination of the weight of memory.

“My calling as a painter, to a large extent, is owed to the fact that when I paint, I don’t think. I am set free from the guilt with which I am shackled,” reflects a tearful Vigas during a solo interview in the film.

The model for the missing painting was Vigas’ brother Reynaldo, and it was the last painting in which Reynaldo ever modeled for his brother. Vigas was chosen to go to France to continue practicing his art, and to no avail Reynaldo begged to go with him. After Vigas left, he never saw his brother again, and the guilt of leaving him behind is the shackling to which he refers.

This movie took a long time to make. What were some of the reasons?

With such a personal story it was virtually impossible to determine how long it would take to finish at the beginning. I unearthed aspects of my family that I never knew. As I progressed, I gradually assimilated and tried to create a logic within the universe of the film. I wanted something that would unite the search for my father’s lost painting with the physical loss of his brother Reynaldo. I knew that was the dramatic heart of the story, but when I started to edit I finished defining the tone and elements that were needed to tell the story.

We filmed in 2008. I was nearly finished, but I set the project aside to make my first fiction feature “Desde allá” (From Afar) in Caracas. After releasing that film I returned to “The Orchid Seller” to get the final cut. Although he did not see that cut, my father was able to see the film before his death in 2014. In total there were 9 years between the beginning of the recordings and the world premiere in the official selection at Venice in 2016.

What was your parents’ response when you told them you wanted to make this film?

I knew both my father and mother would make amazing characters. My intention was to make a film that was not only important as a historical legacy of Venezuela, as my father was one of the most important artists on a continental level of the last century, but that could connect emotionally with audiences of the world as a universal story of the passage of time and the weight of memory. When I told my parents about the project, their responses were very different. My father, who always felt very comfortable when being interviewed, had no problem with a production team invading his private space. On the other hand, it took my mother some time to feel comfortable and accept them.

Your father is an icon in Venezuela, but this film shows that your mother was just as important to his work. Can you talk about her a bit?

My mother was indispensable to telling the story. The transcendence of my father’s work has always counted on the efforts of my mother. She went out to sell a painting when there was no food in my house. She kept in touch with the art galleries. He was a social animal that needed continuous human contact with friends and strangers. He was never interested in promotion, there was no relationship with him and the “art business.” It was my mother who had to do that, sometimes behind his back.

Venezuela is in a difficult moment now. What would it be like to film today?

When the film was shot you could still travel across the country. Today it would be impossible to make a film like this the way we did it. In life, my father was publicly very critical against the regime that was being installed in Venezuela. He was often interviewed by the media and always had strong words against the regime. If we had tried to make the film today surely we would have had many governmental obstacles preventing it.

Oswaldo always spoke his mind. How did he respond to being directed?

My father was fine with the production team from the beginning, but as was his temperament, from time to time he expressed his emotions in the same way as he did in life itself: Without any measure. That meant filming was loaded with continuous surprises.

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STX Entertainment Files IPO Draft Prospectus in Hong Kong – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Robert Simonds’ STX Entertainment has filed a draft prospectus with the Hong Kong Stock Exchange that is expected to lead to an initial public offering of its shares in the coming months.

STX, which counts numerous investors from Greater China among its existing shareholders, would likely become the first U.S.-domiciled Hollywood entertainment firm to list in Hong Kong or China. Hong Kong, a former British colony that returned to China some 20 years ago, has one of the deepest and most orderly capital markets in Asia. It is expected to be one of the top three IPO destinations in the world leader this year.

The draft prospectus shows leading financial institutions J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs as sponsors of the share issue. At this early stage there is no requirement for the company to disclose details of the pricing, how much of its equity will be sold to the public or institutions, nor how much finance it expects to raise through the share sale. Subsequent drafts of the prospectus will likely be issued over the coming three or four months, with each adding new layers of detail.

The prospectus describes an early stage growth company, that books film and TV project development and production expenses as pure cost in its profit and loss statement. As the company releases more films into the market, revenues will catch up. It says that once running at full speed, STX expects to release 12-15 typical films per year.

The draft prospectus shows revenues in the financial year to end September 2017 reaching $201 million. Losses in the same period were $11.8 million. The subsequent quarter to end December showed revenues climbing 41% to $93 million, with losses of $28.1 million. Cash on hand at the end of December had expanded to $109 million at the end of December.

STX was founded in 2011, and began operations in 2014 with the backing of TPG Growth and China’s Hony Capital. Subsequent rounds of capital raising have brought in China’s tech colossus Tencent and Hong Kong telco and media operator PCCW as investors. At the end of last year John Malone’s Liberty Global also took a stake. It is understood that none of these investors are looking to sell their shares in the IPO.

The prospectus pitches STX as being built for the new economy, with a focus on mid-budget ($30-40 million) films, and as straddling the Hollywood and China markets from the outset.  STX recently enjoyed rare crossover success with the Jackie Chan-starring U.S.-China co-production, “The Foreigner,” a dramatic action film directed by Martin Campbell. STX’s development project “Killer’s Game” with Jason Statham has financial backing from Tencent. And, upcoming sci-fi picture, “Steel Soldiers” has financial investment from Alibaba Pictures, part of China’s e-commerce giant Alibaba.

 

 

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Netflix Orders Sci-Fi Series ‘Another Life’ Starring Katee Sackhoff – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Netflix has given a series order to the sci-fi drama “Another Life.”

The series will star Katee Sackhoff as astronaut Niko Breckenridge as she leads a crew on a mission to explore the genesis of an alien artifact. As she and her young crew investigate, they face unimaginable danger on what might very well be a one-way mission. Netflix has ordered a 10-episode first season.

Sackhoff is perhaps best known for her role as Captain Kara “Starbuck” Thrace in “Battlestar Galactica.” She also starred in the series “Longmire,” which originally aired on A&E before moving to Netflix for its final two seasons. She also recently appeared on CW’s “The Flash” in the role of Amunet Black. She is repped by UTA, Bleu, and Jackoway Tyerman.

Aaron Martin is the creator and showrunner of “Another Life.” Noreen Halpern will executive produce. Halfire Entertainment, which produces the Netflix series “Alias Grace,” will produce.

Deadline first reported the series order.

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Julia Holter Says ‘Emotionally Abusive’ Matt Mondanile Made Her ‘Afraid for My Life’ – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Musician Julia Holter posted a long note on Facebook late Tuesday supporting the women who have accused former Real Estate guitarist Matt Mondanile, who she reportedly dated, and saying their allegations are “in line with what I came to know about Matt in the past, which is that he does not have boundaries.

“In my experience, he was emotionally abusive to the point where I had to have a lawyer intervene and was afraid for my life,” she wrote.

Like many other women who suffer from abusive relationships, she said she initially shared her experience with just a few close friends and felt confused about how to address it.

“This subject has been complicated for me to address because I’ve spent over two years now alone/confused about his behavior in my experience, and wondering if there was missing information. So these other accounts have helped me understand,” she wrote. “Thank you to the women who have spoken out, and if there are others out there who find it too hard, that is understandable, and just know that you aren’t alone.”

Read Holter’s full note here. Mondanile’s lawyer did not immediately respond to Variety’s request for comment.

The guitarist left Real Estate early last year ostensibly to focus on his Ducktails solo project, but on Oct. 13 the band issued a statement saying that he’d been fired over “allegations of unacceptable treatment of women.” Several women came forward with specific claims in the following days, and Mondanile issued a statement through his lawyers admitting “inappropriate behavior.”

Holter’s account is the latest in a wave of similar allegations of sexual assault and abuse that have jarred the indie and alternative rock worlds, including allegations made Tuesday by former Crystal Castles singer Alice Glass against the band’s Ethan Kath. In recent months women also have come forward with allegations against PWR BTTM singer Ben Hopkins, solo artist Alex Calder (both of whom have admitted to the accusations) and DJ Gaslamp Killer. In a related development, Marilyn Manson bassist Twiggy Ramirez was accused of rape and abuse by his former girlfriend Jessicka Addams, ex-lead singer of Jack Off Jill.

 

 

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Michel Hazanavicius Boards The Lost Prince with Omar Sy, Berenice Bejo – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Michel Hazanavicius, the Oscar-winning director of “The Artist” whose latest film “Redoutable” competed at Cannes Film Festival last year, is set to direct “The Lost Prince,” a fantasy-filled family comedy which will star Omar Sy (“Intouchables), François Damiens (“Heartbreaker”) and Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”).

“The Lost Prince” is produced by Philippe Rousselet and Jonathan Blumental. Pathé, Studiocanal and TF1 Films Production are co-producing. Studiocanal also handles international sales and will begin pre-sales at Cannes. Pathé will release the film in France. Shooting will begin July 30.

“The Lost Prince” will star Sy as Djibi, a devoted single father whose life revolves around his beloved 7-year-old daughter Sofia.

Every night as Sofia falls asleep, Djibi takes her into “Storyland”, a fantasy film studio where their extraordinary fairytale adventures come to life starring Djibi in the lead role as the heroic Prince Charming. As Sofia eventually grows out of her father’s stories, she starts making up her own tales with Djibi no longer the heroic lead. As his roles in both the real world and in “Storyland” begin to change, Djibi must find a way to forever remain his daughter’s hero.

“I am so excited to work on this new movie. It is made to be a crowd pleaser for families worldwide to enjoy together,” said Hazanavicius. “I want it to be funny, original and emotional and I am very happy that, for the first time in a long time, I will be able to take my whole family to the premiere!”

“The Lost Prince” seems like the right material for Hazanavicius who has a sweet spot for comedies. Although he has never directed a fantasy film, Hazanavicius also has an eye for sophisticated visual styles. His 2011 black & white silent film “The Artist” won five Oscars and worked well at the box office in France and beyond. Hazanavicius was also successful with his two retro spy comedies “OSS 117: Lost in Rio” and “OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spy.”

“The Lost Prince” will mark Hazanavicius’s follow up to “Redoutable,” a comedy-laced romantic film chronicling the tumultuous relationship between iconic French director Jean-Luc Godard and Anne Wiazemsky, set against the backdrop of May 1968 riots in France.

Shooting of “The Lost Prince” will begin July 30.

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