‘The Americans’ Cast and Producers Brace for Emotional Final Season – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Paige Jennings was destined to go into the family business, “The Americans” showrunners Joe Weisberg and Joel Fields told reporters Friday as cast members and producers of the beloved FX drama discussed plans for the show’s sixth and final season, which bows March 28.

Weisberg and Fields said they have been planning for some time for Paige (played by Holly Taylor) to follow her mother into the Soviet spy ranks for some time. Her younger brother Henry (played by Keidrich Sellati), however, is another story.

“From the beginning, Paige sort of had her mother’s Russian soul and that was going to work throughout the series and create a certain darkness inside her,” Weisberg, creator of the 1980s-set series starring Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as covert Soviet spies in Washington, D.C. “But you could feel from the beginning that Henry did not get even the part of his father that had a Russian soul. He got sort of his father’s American side, and even though he probably, like Paige, had deep down some sense that something was wrong, he just didn’t seem affected by it from the very beginning. He seemed like the one true American kid from the beginning.”

Taylor said she’d hoped the Paige would show the same backbone as her mother and become a covert operative. But she also dismissed it as “a far-fetched hope of mine” until the storyline started to come to fruition Season 3. Taylor hailed the show for its nuanced portrayal of female and male characters.

“I feel it doesn’t get talked about enough, that kind of stereotypical gender reversal. It’s like we have such a strong female protagonist who is so gung-ho about her cause and so passionate about it, and then the male character who is so much more sensitive, but it’s not portrayed in any kind of negative light,” Taylor said. “That’s just how they are, and it works for their family. But they also still can get their job done. I think that’s amazing.”

Russell is still too engaged in the hard work of being Elizabeth Jennings to reflect much on the legacy of the FX drama series. It’s not a cushy job at this time of year, she observed. FX had to charter a private plane for “The Americans” team and other network talent to make it to TCA after the Bomb Cyclone snowstorm crippled air travel out of the East Coast.

“We shoot in the dead of winter in New York, and it’s such an uphill sprint in a great way. I think that type of work lends itself to the show and the cold and the struggle of it all,” Russell said. “I feel like heads are still down charging up that hill. There’s not a lot of time for reflection yet. It’s kind of just about getting through these last few months. We really only have two months left, but I will say, because we’ve sort of read a lot of the scripts now, that it feels really good and satisfying what Joe and Joel have created.”

Among other highlights from the session:

Weisberg and Fields said they have known the broad arc of the series ending for some time, but they are still fine-tuning the final script. “We won’t be done writing it until we land on the very last frame that we lock of the final episode,” Fields said.

Taylor pointed out a tantalizing mystery from the show’s standing kitchen set. “In the Jennings’ kitchen, there are two dogs on the fridge, and none of us know where that dog came from,” she said.

Rhys made reference to fact that the show has changed his life by bringing him together, off screen, with Russell. Russell had her first child, a boy, with Rhys last year. “I reflect on it every morning when he wakes us up at 5 a.m., and I say, ‘How did you happen?’ ” Rhys said.

(Pictured: Joe Weisberg, Joel Fields, Keri Russell)

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Univision Stations Go Dark on Dish Amid Contract Battle – Variety

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More than 60 Univision O&O station have gone dark on Dish’s national platforms as the companies battle over a new carriage contract.

The Univision-owned stations and cable channels including Univision Deportes and Galavision went dark at 4 p.m. PT as the previous contract expired.

The sides have been negotiating a new pact for weeks. Dish on Friday night declared the talks at an impasse.

“Given current events impacting the Hispanic community, we call on Univision to return its signal to DISH, DishLATINO and Sling TV customers as soon as possible. This is not the time to be making outrageous demands to make up for bad business decisions, or, as many have suggested, better position themselves for a sale,” said Alfredo Rodríguez Diaz-Marta, VP of DishLatino and Sling.

Univision said Dish rejected its offer of a two-week contract extension to allow talks to continue without an interruption of service for Dish and Sling customers. Dish’s satellite and streaming platforms have about 13.1 million subscribers.

“It is outrageous that Dish has rejected our offer of a two-week contract extension to allow its customers and our viewers to continue to have access to Univision’s highly rated networks and stations. While Dish has routinely used blackouts against broadcasters—its 68 broadcast blackouts since 2010 are significantly more than any other distributor in that time — Univision expected Dish to take our negotiations and its commitment to Hispanic consumers seriously when it told its customers this week that it wanted to ‘reach a mutually beneficial deal’ for Univision’s ‘high quality content,’ ” Univision said in a statement.

The dispute between Dish and Univision is the latest example of tension between programmers and MVPDs as the traditional TV eco-system adjusts to audience fragmentation, the migration of viewership to on-demand platforms and the influx of direct-to-consumer streaming platforms such as Netflix.

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‘The Resident’ Consultant Under Review Amid ‘Code Black’ Sexual Harassment Claims – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Twentieth Century Fox Television is reviewing a sexual-harassment claim against Zachary Lutsky, a prominent Hollywood medical consultant who currently works on Fox’s “The Resident” and was the subject of a human-resources investigation while working on ABC Studios “Code Black,” Variety has learned.

“We have only recently learned of these allegations through an inquiry from a reporter,” said a spokesman for 20th Century Fox TV. “We are not aware of any claims made concerning his conduct on ‘The Resident.’ We take these matters seriously and are reviewing this.”

Lutsky served as a medical consultant on season two of “Code Black,” which is produced by ABC Studios and CBS Television Studios. Three sources close to the production told Variety that in 2016 Lutsky had already been informed that his contract would not be picked up for the following season when two female employees told producers that they had been subjected to continuous verbal sexual harassment by Lutsky over a period of several months. The two women met with producers on Dec. 12. The following day, Lutsky was informed that a human-resources investigation into the complaint had been opened. He was asked not to return to the production.

“I am quite disturbed by these heartbreaking anonymous allegations,” Lutsky said in a statement to Variety. “I take them very seriously and categorically deny them. I sincerely care for the feelings of everyone I encounter, including friends and co-workers, and I conduct myself in a way that treats all people with dignity and respect. As a physician, I have dedicated my life to helping those in need. In my 16 years of practice, I have never been accused of any wrongdoing. True harassment allegations are serious. I have never engaged in, been fired for nor been found guilty of any allegation of misconduct — ever.”

A spokesperson for ABC Studios, the lead producer on “Code Black,” declined to comment. Among the series Lutsky previously worked on were CBS Television Studios’ “A Gifted Man”; Warner Bros. Television’s “Hart of Dixie,” “Miami Medical” and “ER”; and Sony Pictures Television’s “The Mob Doctor.” He was credited as a producer on multiple episodes of “Code Black.”

In addition to his television experience, Lutsky is an active physician who works in emergency medicine at Cedars Sinai Medical Center.

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Drake Crushes Spotify’s One-Day Streaming Record – Variety

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In its first day of release, Drake’s “Scorpion” shattered Spotify’s one-day global record for album streams, according to data on SpotifyCharts.com. According to those figures, the album’s individual track totaled 132,450,203 streams, more than 50,000,000 greater than the previous record, set just weeks ago by Post Malone’s “Beerbongs & Bentleys,” which was streamed 78,744,748 times globally on its first day of release.

A rep for Spotify did not confirm those “Scorpion” numbers officially, noting that its SpotifyCharts page may not be fully accurate, and the numbers currently on the site were slightly different than the ones first reported by Music Business Worldwide early Saturday. Variety will report the official numbers when they are released.

If the album’s streaming numbers were to continue at this rate — which seems unlikely — it would easily top 1 billion streams in its first week, obliterating the previous record. That mark was also set by “Beerbongs & Bentleys” last month, with 236,500,546 streams in the U.S. and 411,816,710 globally in its first week. Guess whose record that last number broke? Drake’s, for last year’s 22-track mixtape “More Life,” which set the record with 385 million streams.

On other services, “Scorpion” became the No. 1 album on the Apple Music charts in 92 countries almost instantly upon release, and at presstime its 25 songs occupy the top 25 spots on Apple Music (with XXXTentacion’s “SAD!” at No. 26). Amazon and Tidal had not posted numbers at press time.

The labels involved (Republic, Cash Money and Young Money) seemingly have launched a full-scale campaign to break as many streaming records as possible, something that the album’s length makes a lot more likely than, say a seven-track album. In an unexpected move, given Drake’s long history with Apple Music, they’ve also gone big with Spotify, teaming up with the service for its first-ever global dedicated artist takeover, called “ScorpionSZN,” whereby Drake takes over multiple playlists on the same day. The MC is on the cover of RapCaviar, Beast Mode, Today’s Top Hits, Morning Commute and others — including ones where his music isn’t even featured.

Late Friday afternoon, the RIAA announced that Drake has become its top certified digital singles artist, with 142 million to date — a number that’s sure to grow in the coming days.

Stats will be updated through the coming hours and days.

 

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Why Drinking is King in Country Music, Even for Sober Artists – Variety

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Booze is as much a staple of the country music scene as boots and back roads, and a recent article in the Washington Post looked into that connection and the influence of alcohol on Nashville, whom some cheekily refer to as “a drinking town with a music problem.”

According country musicians interviewed, having the appearance of using booze as pleasure or to drown sorrows is a major factor in being considered “authentic” in the Nashville scene. This is a holdover from the days of Hank Williams, a country idol who died at age 29 of a heart attack after a life of alcohol and substance abuse. As the Post points out, this view has led to the death of several country music stars.

“I thought everybody had to drink to be in this business,” country singer Keith Whitley said in an interview not long before his death at the age of 33 in 1989. “Lefty [Frizzell] drank, Hank drank, George Jones was still drinking, and I had to. That’s just the way it was. You couldn’t put that soul in your singing if you weren’t about three sheets in the wind.”

However, alcohol also plays a key role in drawing brand sponsorship dollars to the Nashville music business. When writer Emily Yahr asked Florida Georgia Line about their music’s relationship to alcohol, and name-checking Fireball whiskey in their hit “Round Here,” GFL member Tyler Hubbard said, “We reached out [to Fireball] and asked how it benefited them, and they said it was pretty drastic. That made us feel good. But also, it made us think, why don’t we start our own brand?”

He added, “We like to have a good time, but maybe drink a little bit less than we used to. As our manager says, if you’re gonna party like a man at night, you’ve gotta work like a man in the morning.”

This led to the group branding a peach-pecan whiskey brand, and they aren’t alone. As Yahr writes, companies will even reach out to sponsor artists who write about the dark side of alcohol, such as Trey Smith and Jennifer Fiedler, whose single “Hey Whiskey,” a song about the breakdown of a relationship due to alcohol addiction, prompted an endorsement from Rebecca Creek Distillery.

At the same time, Nashville is home to many who are in recovery, and songwriters contend that grabbing a few beers is common after — or during — a session. This can make it difficult for the people in the industry who don’t drink.

Yahr points to Keith Urban, Brantley Gilbert, and Tim McGraw as examples of artists who speak about sobriety, despite how often booze pops up in some of their songs (Brad Paisley, who doesn’t drink, wrote “Alcohol,” which reached number four on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts and peaked at number 28 overall on the Hot 100).

Ray Scott is an example of an artist who feared pressure from his fans after he gave up drinking and became sober. Yahr wrote, “Initially, he was concerned fans would be disappointed to learn he didn’t drink.

“Some fans can kind of build you up to be this thing that they think you are, and a couple of these songs sort of painted a picture of who I was,” Scott said. “I’ve been pleased that people take it for what it is. It’s just fun music; I don’t have to live the part.”

The country music industry is as intertwined with the distillery and brewery industries as it can get, and that won’t change anytime soon, according to Yahr.

“There’s no doubt the audience appreciates this,” she writes. “And as Nashville continues to see dollar signs (a CMA study this spring found ‘country music consumers are spending more on alcohol’ these days), artists will keep singing about it.”

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How Spanish-Language Media Fails to Recognize LGBT and Other Diverse Content (Guest Column) – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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When I came to the United States at age six with my family, none of us spoke English. It was tough. We had to maneuver many new and frightening things. Media sometimes helped bridge that large and cold divide between our old home and our new home. That moment, of turning on the TV and hearing someone speak the language of your past, of your dreams, the language spoken by the people you left behind, was powerful.

It is still powerful. For immigrants, who today arguably (and sadly) face more discrimination than we faced in the 1970s, media can be a place of comfort.

The connection is intellectual as well as emotional. Spanish-language media does a good job covering stories. Everything from daily detentions, raids, deportations, and confusing changes in policy that hurt immigrants, to natural disasters and the misdeeds of political figures like Joe Arpaio, is often covered more deeply in Spanish-language media.

Those of who are bilingual can turn to Spanish-language media for news about the world, but can we tune in when we want to be entertained? When we need a laugh or a good cry? The answer’s a resounding no if you’re LGBTQ or simply want to see diverse stories and characters. LGBTQ people, people of color and people with disabilities are practically nowhere to be found in Spanish-language entertainment.

GLAAD just published a tally of these disappointing numbers in its Spanish-language media report, Still Invisible, the second installment of its report that analyzes the LGBTQ characters in primetime scripted television. The percentages of LGBTQ characters stayed virtually the same as last year, and the stories remained as shallow as ever.

Of a total of 698 characters in shows airing in the United States between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017 on primetime (7 p.m. to 11 p.m.), just 19 (3%) were LGBTQ. And most were not main characters.

Of the LGBTQ characters, six (30%) died and six did not have motivations of their own – they only served to further other characters storylines. No transgender men were represented, only one transgender woman was shown and bisexual women were often represented stereotypically, as sexually voracious—essentially a way to include presumably titillating sexuality between women while keeping a heterosexual pairing as the central story. In a few examples the gay character, or the character assumed to be gay, was a clichéd trope and present only for laughs.

All of this makes us what to say to producers in Mexico, Colombia, Miami and Los Angeles, it is not the 1970s! We are sick and tired of either being either invisible or insignificant.

Some producers are making an effort and streaming platforms are starting to catch up, with LGBTQ characters in shows like “Ingobernable” or “Chicas del Cable” on Netflix, but it’s not enough.

As a friend recently pointed out, “Will & Grace” not only happened once for English-language TV viewers, but they’re back for a second go-around. Those of us who are Latinx are still waiting for a story like that, in which the leads are LGBTQ and have actual roles to play in the narrative, as opposed to acting like colorful (literally often dressed in bright colors) window dressings. Where is our “Scandal” or “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Empire,” “Glee,” or “Orange is the New Black”? These shows, by the way, are hits not only in the United States, but abroad.

Why? Because inclusion is good for the bottom line.

The business case for diversity is powerful. Younger Latinx people are much-coveted consumers because they spend a lot of money on entertainment. Increasingly, however, young people, of all ethnicities, are cutting the cord. If we want them to remain loyal, they have to see themselves represented.

English-language entertainment and news media should also pay attention because they, too, face a dearth of diverse faces and stories, as organizations like the National Hispanic Media Coalition and the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) have pointed out for years. GLAAD’s Where We are on TV report points to a lack of diversity in terms of ethnicity, disabilities, or LGBTQ characters.

Research done by GLAAD and Harris Poll found that 20% of respondents from age 18-34 did not identify as heterosexual nor did they adhere to traditional definitions of gender. These younger viewers are not seeing themselves represented.

Like a lot of Latinx people, I love Spanish-language media. I love the voices, the points of view, the way it makes me feel connected to my native Uruguay but also to Mexico, where so much of my extended family hails from. And Puerto Rico, where so many friends come from, and beautiful Chile, Peru, and Colombia. But, like a lot of Latinx people, I’m tired of being invisible. I want to sit down, like I did as a kid and watch TV with my family and not roll my eyes or walk away annoyed at seeing yet another portrayal straight out of the 70s.

My family and all families, including grandma or abuela, can handle a good LGBTQ storyline, because, more and more, abuela and mom and dad know lots of openly LGBTQ people. And, if she’s anything like mine, abuela has seen a thing or two in her life and is not going to stop watching a novela because it has a queer lead with an actual storyline that matters. She might even tune in because of that very storyline.

Monica Trasandes is the director of Spanish Language and Latinx Media & Representation at GLAAD.

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ADL’s Plans to Take on Gamergate, Hate in Gaming – Variety

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The Anti-Defamation League is taking its fight against hate to the world of video games, starting with supporting and training game developers in hopes of eventually reaching the massive 2.6 billion person gaming audience.

“The ADL has worked in digital environments since 1985,” said Daniel Kelley, associate director of the center for technology and society at the ADL. “We’ve been on bulletin boards, websites, and social media. I feel like it’s a natural evolution for us starting to think through what does a digital environment mean. Games are a huge part of that. It’s not just Twitter and Facebook, ‘Fortnite’ is a platform. ‘League of Legends’ is a platform.”

Cybercenter
The ADL’s center for technology and society was announced in 2015, but didn’t formally launch until last year. In October, the group was working with the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment in California on a project when they were introduced to the idea of a game jam. Kelley said the ADL decided to run a game jam based on anti-bias education. The jam resulted in 33 games and so impressed the group that they started to look into using the approach on a broader scale. It also kicked off a more in-depth look into the world of gaming and game development.

Kelley said he started having informal discussions with groups like the International Game Developers Association, Playcrafting, Games for Change, and schools like NYU.

He said he found a group of people who had a “real hunger” for engagement from the ADL to “address some of the problems in games.”

“We did a listening tour of different folks, academics, practitioners, others,” he said. “We read a lot about Gamergate in the press and about the harassment, but we wanted to hear from the community about what the problems are that the ADL can help with.”

That led to a summit of sorts at GDC with special interest groups. The ADL found there were three prongs of gaming that they could address: the culture in which games are made, the culture of players, and the games themselves.

They decided that working with the culture in which games are made was the best way to move the needle on combating the larger issues.

The concept is that if the culture in which games are made can be improved, that could in turn lead to more responsible games and then perhaps impact the people who play them.

“The idea is that there is a multiplier effect for engaging a game developer,” Kelley said. “They have a tremendous reach across the game community and can have a broader impact.”

Kelley is quick to point out that the issues the ADL seeks to address in gaming — issues of bias, hate, and harassment — aren’t unique to gaming.

“A lot of these problems are part of systemic problems, not just part of the gaming community,” he said. “It’s not unique to the game community, but there is something unique to who the community speaks to and something unique to the reach the game community has.”

Games for Change
The ADL hasn’t yet solidified how it will address some of these issues inside game development studios and with publishers.

“We are experimenting, trying to see what that looks like, talking to game companies and other entities,” he said.

On Friday, Karen Schrier, the director of games at Marist College, will discuss one of those experiments during a Games for Change panel about fostering empathy and decision-making through games. The ADL is also in the process of putting together a framework for another game jam later this year. This time it will be partnering with the Global Game Jam.

“We are going to focus on the building blocks, starting with identity issues, and have folks talk about what identity means and how that can be expressed in a game,” Kelley said. “But it’s not one and done. It’s a lifelong process of becoming aware of ways in which bias is part of life.”

Bias is the largest, base level of what the ADL calls the pyramid of hate. The pyramid’s next level is acts of bias, then discrimination, bias-motivated violence, and finally genocide.

“The ADL works at every level,” Kelley said. “Education is proactive, starting at the base level of the pyramid.”

The approach the ADL plans to use in video games is similar to what it used in schools, where they trained principals and teachers who then passed on those lessons to students.

The group plans to work with the NYU Game Center to create a course this fall that will incorporate the ADLs work on game-related media designed for impact. Theyre also working with the IGDA to create new developer-focused programming to fight hate and bias in the game community.

Finally, Kelley said, it makes sure to be more proactive about being more vocal in its support of people working to make games better, and to call out those who misuse gaming platforms to proliferate hate and bigotry.

Gamergate
While this is the start of the ADL’s deeper dive into issues of hate and harassment in gaming, it’s not the first time the group addressed those issues.

In 2016, the ADL flew five national experts in online hate to Austin for SXSW’s first online harassment summit, an event created in the wake of Gamergate.

Gamergate, Kelley said, remains an issue still today, four years after it kicked off. GamerGate arose in 2014, ostensibly over concerns about ethics in game journalism, and quickly coalesced into a group of self-identified members whose concerns expanded to include the rise of what they labeled “PC culture” and “social justice warriors.” The more vocal of the group typically harass people, more often women and minorities, who question some of the status quo of game content in the video game industry. GamerGate harassment is most often sparked by the expansion of gaming content, settings, and characters to include more women, minorities, and the examination of modern social issues.

Earlier this year, Kelley wrote a post for the ADL’s blog about using video games to reduce bias and fight hate. In it he mentioned Gamergate once, the result was a wave of vitriolic responses, he said.

“Prior to posting it, I sent it to colleagues in the game community and they said you’re writing about Gamergate, look out, there’s going to be a pile on,” he said. “That speaks to the seriousness in which hate bias and harassment in games is impacting people.”

“From our discussions with people in the industry, Gamergate isn’t over, it remains a significant problem, part of a serious issue that needs to be taken seriously and the ADL takes it seriously,” he added. “It impacts people’s lives, impacts a person’s ability to do their job.”

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New EPA Policy Reduces Animal Tests! – Helping others with HeathTips and #Research #Videos



The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that it has begun accepting nonanimal methods for detecting the skin sensitization—or allergenic—potential of chemicals and pesticides. Learn more from the Physicians Committee’s Kristie Sullivan, M.P.H.: https://www.pcrm.org/media/news/statement-by-kristie-sullivan-mph-physicians-committee-vice-president-of-research-policy

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#Helping others with #HeathTips and #Research #Videos

Teachers Still More Effective at Educating Than ‘Assassin’s Creed’ – Variety

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“Assassin’s Creed Origins’” educational Discovery Tour mode was nearly as effective at educating grade and high school students about Ancient Egypt as a teacher, according to some preliminary research into the effectiveness of the add-on.

But there are quite a few catches.

The study was rather small, it tested knowledge on a very simple subject, and did so right after the students had either played the game or been instructed by a teacher.

Ultimately, those instructed by the game saw a 44% improvement of their knowledge and those lectured by a teacher saw a 51% improvement.

The most important takeaway from both Ubisoft’s creation of the free Discovery Tour add-on and the research was that the project is worth doing.

The information came out of a presentation Thursday night in New York City at the annual Games for Change Festival where Maxime Durand, the historian for Ubisoft’s “Assassin’s Creed” franchise, and University of Montreal professor Marc-André Éthier were among the presenters.

During their talk, the two outlined the creation of the Discovery Tour, it’s current state, and the desire to move it forward as an educational aid.

The Discovery Tour allows players of “Origins” to activate a mode that disables the game’s fighting systems and then explore a number of educational tours on a variety of historic topics in-game.

Durand said the first runthrough of those tours resulted in what would have been two-and-a-half hour sessions. That was thrown out and pared down to roughly five minutes. They were initially considering just 20 tours in the mode, but ended up with 75, he added.

Éthier, a former high school teacher who has been a professor of social sciences methodology at the university since 2004, has been working since 2015 on how teachers use textbooks and tools like films, books, graphic novels, and video games to teach history.

He did a study on the effectiveness of the game as a teacher after Ubisoft gave 300 students, aged 12 to 17, from nine schools a chance to try it out.

He said he took 40 students, split them into two groups and then had a test administered to check their knowledge on a specific tour topic.

He then had 20 of the students try the Discovery Tour and the other 20 students received a 12-minute lecture on the same topic from the teacher. Afterward, he tested the group again.

While the results showed that the teacher was still more effective as a tool for learning, it also generated a number of interesting questions, he said.

Questioned afterward, the students said that they find it to be easier to understand what parts of the information they were receiving was important when a teacher was present. Those that finished early, he found, went on to try other locations. The students also admitted they’d be unlikely to try Discovery Tour at home — instead they’d likely just play the regular game.

Éthier said in the future he would like to measure how effective the mode is in teaching more complex notions about things like society, politics, and agency and that he’d like to see if it could be used to measure the development of critical thinking. He also thinks it’s possible it could be more effective when used in conjunction with a teacher, rather than on its own.

While Ubisoft is currently developing a new Assassin’s Creed game, the Ancient Greece “Assassin’s Creed Odyssey,” they’ve declined to say whether it will include a Discovery mode too.

But Durand certainly made it sound like Ubisoft as a company isn’t done with the idea of education through Assassin’s Creed. He said the team would like to make the requirements to run the mode as a standalone, lower on a PC and that they have other work to do as well.

“This is the first time we did this,” he said. “It’s not perfect. But hopefully we’ll get more feedback.”

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Alice Glass Accuses Former Crystal Castles Bandmate of Sexual Assault, Abuse – Variety – Sharing Variety Magazine

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Alice Glass, former lead singer of Crystal Castles, on Tuesday published a long post on her website accusing her former bandmate Ethan Kath of sexual assault and abuse beginning when she was 15 years old.

Her account is the latest in a wave of similar allegations of sexual assault and abuse that have jarred the indie and alternative rock world, including allegations against former Real Estate guitarist Matt Mondanile, solo artist Alex Calder (who have both admitted to the accusations) and DJ Gaslamp Killer. In a related development, Marilyn Manson bassist Twiggy Ramirez was accused of rape and abuse by his former girlfriend Jessicka Addams, ex-lead singer of Jack Off Jill.

Kath and Glass formed the group in Toronto in 2006; Glass left in 2014 after the pair had released three albums and Kath has carried on with singer Edith Frances. After the split, Glass and Kath sniped at each other in public statements (“I wish my former vocalist the best of luck in her future endeavors… it should be rewarding for her considering she didn’t appear on Crystal Castles’ best known songs,” Kath wrote) but the allegations she published today are far more serious. (Read her full post here.)

“I met ‘Ethan Kath’ (Claudio Palmieri) when I was in the 10th grade,” she writes. “The first time he took advantage of me was when I was around 15. He was 10 years older than me. I came to in the back of his car extremely intoxicated (from drinks he had given me that night). We didn’t talk for months after that. … He tracked me down and showed up places I was hanging out and we eventually reconnected. I was very young and naive and in a compromised position in my life. I perceived him as a local rock star because I had seen his band, Kill Cheerleader, on TV. A lot of my friends from the punk scene had also been taken advantage of by much older men, so to me, it was a situation that had been normalized.

“Claudio was very manipulative towards me. He figured out my insecurities and exploited them: he used the things he learned about me against me. Over a period of many months, he gave me drugs and alcohol and had sex with me in an abandoned room at an apartment he managed. It wasn’t always consensual and he remained sober whenever we were together.”

She then writes of the early days of the band, which she says she enjoyed but “he created a toxic environment that I often felt I had to go along with.” She says as the band’s fame grew, Kath persuaded her to quit high school just two credits away from graduation. “As we started to gain attention, he abusively and systematically targeting my insecurities and controlling my behavior: my eating habits, who I could talk to, where I could go, what I could say in public, what I was allowed to wear.

“He became physically abusive,” she continues. “He held me over a staircase and threatened to throw me down it. He picked me up over his shoulders and threw me onto concrete. He took pictures of my bruises and posted them online. I tried to leave, and he swore that it would never happen again, that he would never physically abuse me again. … He controlled everything I did. I wasn’t allowed to have my own phone or my own credit card, he decided who my friends were, read through my private emails, restricted my access to social media, regulated everything I ate. … He forced me to have sex with him or, he said, I wouldn’t be allowed to be in the band anymore. I was miserable and my lyrics indirectly spoke to the pain and oppression that I was enduring. But as is sometimes the case in abusive relationships, his cruelty was often followed by kindness. He was very good at keeping his terrible treatment of me private. … I was suicidal for years.”

She concludes, “Leaving Crystal Castles was the single most difficult decision I’ve ever made—that band was everything to me. My music, my performances and my fans were all I had in the world. I gave that up and started over not because I wanted to but because I had to.”

In introducing the note, Glass writes: “Some of you may be aware that I’ve opened up about my experiences with abuse in the past,” she writes. “I’ve been very guarded about the information I’ve given and I haven’t publicly named names—because I’ve been afraid. I’ve been threatened and harassed and as a result, out of fear, I’ve been silenced.

“The momentum that’s been created recently by the many courageous women who have opened up about their own stories has inspired me to finally be more direct, at whatever cost. This is for my own recovery, for the other women who have been, are currently, or may be in a similar situation with the man who abused me for years, and for those in abusive relationships who are looking to stand up and speak out.”

A rep for Kath and Crystal Castles did not immediately respond to Variety’s request for comment.

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